FAMILYCOMMUNITY INSPIRATION RESOURCES PARTNERS



Get Paid for your Art??
 
By: Dan Miller

Spending By Major Agencies On Artists
Department of Agriculture $186,000, National Science Foundation $187,500, Labor $400,000
Postal Service $378,000, U. S. Geological Survey $100,000, Food and Drug Administration $200,000, Federal Emergency Management Agency $ 25,000, U. S. Customs Service $ 40,000, National Park Service $1,900,000
Here are some examples of artists who have landed art contracts with the government:
Artists Who Received Government Contracts
-Jacob Lawrence received $95,000 to create a ceramic tile wall mosaic to be placed in the Joseph P. Addabbo Federal Building in Queens, NY. GSA, 1989.
-Linda Sherman Design, Inc., of Gaithersburg, MD, received $432,000 to provide graphic art and editorial support services to NASA in 1990.
-Manuel Neri received $100,000 to create a marble sculpture entitled "Ventana al Pacifico" that was placed outside the Gus J. Solomon Courthouse in Portland, Oregon. GSA, 1989.
-Gerald Farrar and Associates, Inc., of Tulsa, OK, received $3,540 to provide graphic art services to the Department of Energy in 1991.
-Lehman-Scaffa Photo and Art of Silver Spring, MD, received $12,000 to provide graphic arts services to the National Science Foundation, including viewgraphs, slides, charts, maps, mechanical and conceptual drawings, page layouts, publication covers, signs, typesetting, posters, prints, negatives, and exhibit materials.
-Hugh Moore and Associates of Alexandria, VA, received $35,000 from the National Science Foundation to provide graphic art support services, including designing educational pieces for a national science program.
-Inkwell, Inc., of Washington, D.C., received $10,000 from the USDA to provide graphic art support services.
-Douglass Harding Group of Washington, D.C., received $32,000 from the USDA to provide graphic art support services in 1990.
-Thomas Baldwin, Inc., of Alexandria, VA, received $138,000 from the Forest Service to design the interior of the Service's National Visitors Center.
-Standsbury Ronsaville Wood Inc., of Annapolis, MD, landed a contract from the National Park Service worth $16,000 to provide graphic design services, including illustrations, layout, exhibit production, publication design, and more in 1991.
-Nelson/Hendrickson of Purcellville, VA, landed a contract from the National Park Service worth $72,948 to provide production-ready wayside exhibit plan packages.
-Maria Alquilar received $19,000 to create a high fired clay sculpture for the General Services Administration that was placed in the Main Border Station in San Luis, AZ.
-Caleb Bach received $18,000 to produce two paintings entitled "The Effects of Good and Bad Government" that were placed in the Seattle Courthouse.
-Robert Brooks received $4,000 to create a photographic mural that was placed in the U.S. Border Station in Fort Kent, ME. GSA, 1984.
-Houston Conwill received $49,000 to create a bronze sculpture on a granite platform that was placed in the Joseph P. Addabbo Federal Building in Queens, NY.
-The painter, Blue Sky, received $12,600 to create an oil painting entitled "Moonlight on the Great Pee Dee" which was placed in the J.M. McMillan Federal Building in Florence, SC. GSA, 1978.
-Frank Smith received $20,000 to create a ceramic tile wall mural for the Joseph P. Addabbo Federal Building in Queens, NY. GSA, 1989.
-Another Color, Inc., received $422,000 to provide graphic art and editorial support services to NASA in 1990.
-Creative Service, Inc., received $200,000 to provide graphic art and editorial support services to NASA in 1990.
We've put together an agency-by-agency listing of the people who will look at your work, get it reviewed, and put your name on their vendors list so you can get in on these contracting opportunities and others in the future. In many cases we've also included the kinds of projects these agencies most often hire freelancers to work on, from brochures and book design to exhibits and promotional posters.
When To Apply
Keep in mind that because new contracts are awarded at the beginning of the government's fiscal year in October, you should make sure that an agency you're interested in working for has seen your portfolio by late spring or early summer - this will give them enough time to consider you and the services that you offer for the current fiscal year. Otherwise you may have to wait an entire year before you get any work, especially the larger contracts.
Find Out Past Winning Contracts
Because many art contracts are awarded on a competitive bid basis, you should be aware of successful bids in the past before you submit a bid of your own. Through a Freedom of Information Act Request from the agency in question, you can get copies of winning bids on art contracts from previous years. Remember, the competition on these contracts is very high, but most artists don't know how to use the Freedom of Information Act to give them the edge. Do some quick research into these winning contracts to find out what made them win the competitive bid - it might involve more than just having the lowest price on services rendered.
Small Contracts
For smaller contracts valued under $25,000, many agencies award Blanket Purchase Agreements (BPAs) to artists they like to work with. Getting a BPA means that the agency agrees to offer you work up to a certain value over the period of the fiscal year, often up to $25,000. For larger jobs, the agency may send out project announcements to three artists on their bidder's list and ask for bid proposals. Each agency conducts the bidding procedure slightly differently and you should contact a particular agency to find out how they operate. For even small jobs, such as those for $2,500 or less, an agency may simply pull the name of an artist out of their Rolodex and call them for a quote on a job. If they think the price is in line with what they want to spend, they'll simply award the job to that one artist. Many jobs are awarded on this basis. Obviously, it pays to be persistent and to keep your name in front of the individual that has a say in awarding contracts.
Artists Who Received Money from the National Park Service in a Recent Year:
Lloyd Townsend $ 6,663, Hugh Brown $ 14,721, Robert Hynes $ 4,020, Louis Glanzman $ 9,362, Glenn Moy $ 9,511, Charles Hazard $ 3,528, Steven Patricia $ 7,020, Robert Hynes, $ 8,786, Chris White Design, $ 50,974, Dorothy Novick $ 4,056, G.S. Images $ 236,294, General Graphics $ 268,363, G.S. Images $ 86,643, Specialty Graphics $ 103,932, General Graphics $ 17,246, Scribing Graphics $ 100,167
Who To Contact For Contracts
Agriculture Department
James Schleyer, Design Division, Room 516A, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250 ,202-720-4337
Each year the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) contracts out about 40% to 60% of its design work to freelance artists. Contracts are awarded to freelancers through the procurement office, which maintains a list of approved artists that receive notification of requests for bids when a contract needs fulfilling. To get on this contracting list, artists must have their portfolios reviewed and approved. To set up an appointment to have your portfolio reviewed, contact James Schleyer, chief of the Design Division.
Commerce Department
Office of Administrative Operations, Visual and Electronic Communications Division ,Design and Graphics, Room 2864 ,U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, DC, 20230, 202-482-3061
The U.S. Department of Commerce contracts out about 20% of their graphics and design work to freelancers. This work often includes publication design, poster design, exhibits, presentation charts, framing and mounting, and much more. If you're interested in being considered for some of this work, contact the Graphics Branch and arrange for a portfolio review. If they can use the kind of work you do, they may decide to sign you to a Blanket Purchase Agreement where you'll receive up to a certain dollar amount of work throughout the year. This division awards about 40 BPAs each year.
Customs Service
U.S. Customs Service, 1301 Constitution Ave., NW, Graphics Department, Washington, DC, 20229, 202-927-0314
The Customs Service hires artists on a freelance basis to work on some of their projects that involve graphics, such as 30 x 40 presentation boards, color graphics, exhibits, and the like. To be considered for this work, you'll need to get your portfolio reviewed before June/July when new contracts are awarded for the new fiscal year. If they're interested in using you, they may sign you to a blanket purchase agreement where you'll be awarded projects up to a certain total dollar amount over the year. The U.S. Customs Service spends between $30,000 and $40,000 per year on freelance graphic art.
Drug Enforcement Agency
Chief, Contracting and Procurement Unit, Drug Enforcement Agency, 1405 I St., NW, Washington, DC 20537, 202-633-2894
From time to time the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) contracts for graphics support for their different programs, such as education and interdiction. If you're interested in doing freelance graphics work for the DEA, you'll need to submit an SF-129 to this office. Once you're on file, if they're interested in using your talents, they'll contact you when an appropriate project comes up and ask you to submit a bid.
Energy Department
William Talbot, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20585, 202-586-2732
This office produces the technical graphics support for the Department of Energy (DoE), and they hire the services of design firms that can produce technical computer graphics. If your computer graphics company is interested in competing on DoE contracts, you'll need to submit a Solicitation Mailing List Application (SF-129), which is available by contacting this office. This form asks you to provide basic background on your company, including size, computer capabilities, and experience. Once selected, graphics companies are kept on list, and when a job comes up, DoE will contact three or four firms and ask them to submit bids on the contract.
Bob Stiefel
Printing Operations, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, GE-116, Washington, DC 20585, 202-586-6035
This graphics section of the Department of Energy (DoE) does exhibit design and construction and print media production. Once a year in March and April, design contractors used over the previous year are reviewed. Interviews with new design artists interested in doing print media
work with DoE are then scheduled. This interview process includes a portfolio review. If selected as a contractor, designers are held under Blanket Purchasing Agreements and are called in on an irregular basis for bid sessions during which they bid against each other on the available projects. Contact the department if you're interested in having your portfolio reviewed during March and April.
Environmental Protection Agency
James Ingram, Visual Information Specialist, Editorial Services Division, Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M St., SW, MS 1704, Washington, DC 20460, 202-260-4359
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hires the services of graphic artists to do all kinds of projects, including presentation exhibits, view graphs, slide shows, publication designs, cover illustrations, photography, and much more. To be considered for this work, you'll need to arrange with Mr. Ingram for an interview where your portfolio will be reviewed. EPA hires freelance artists three different ways. For small jobs with a quick turn-around, artists are used on a on call basis, where EPA will call you up with a job they think you can do and ask for a price. If they like the price, you get the job. They also hold a certain number of artists under Blanket Purchasing Agreements, where you get work during the year adding up to a certain total amount of the agreement. For large projects, EPA will choose three artists on their vendors list and send out requests for proposals. The lowest bid gets the job.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Susan Rappa, Graphics Department, Room 315, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C St., SW, Washington, DC 20472, 202-646-3475
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) puts about ten graphic artists and designers under contract per year. If you're interested in showing your work to FEMA, contact the department and arrange to go in for a portfolio review. If they're interested in using your services, you may be recommended for a Blanket Purchase Agreement where you'll be asked to submit bids on projects as they come up, with the lowest bid getting the job. FEMA spends about $25,000 per year on freelance art services.
Fish and Wildlife Service
Tom Nebel, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, 1849 C St., NW, Room 3544, Washington, DC 20240, 202-208-4111
The Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) contracts out all kinds of graphic design services, from illustration and photography to calligraphy and book design. To be considered for these contracting opportunities you'll need to contact this office and set up a portfolio review. If you live in an area of the country other than the Washington, D.C., area, you should contact the Fish and Wildlife Service field office nearest you. If they like your work and want to use you, FWS will notify you when projects matching your capabilities arise, and you'll be asked to make bids on them. On smaller projects, they may simply call you up and ask for a price and to determine whether you can get the project done in the allotted time.
Food and Drug Administration
Jesse Nichols, Office of Communications, Food and Drug Administration, 5600 Fishers Ln., HFI-40, Room 15A-19, Rockville, MD 20857, 301-443-3210
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) contracts graphic artists and designers to work on editorial illustrations, exhibit design, posters, photographic projects, and much more. If you're interested in being considered for this work, contact this office and arrange for a portfolio review. If they'd like to use your talents, they may decide to sign you to a Blanket Purchase Agreement where you'll receive up to a certain dollar amount of work throughout the year by bidding on individual projects as they arise. This office at FDA signs about 10 artists each year under freelance contract.
General Services Administration
Tim Hinton or Arlethia McGhee, Office of Graphic Design, General Services Administration, 18th and F Sts., NW, Washington, DC 20405, 202-501-0742
The General Services Administration (GSA) hires artists to do all kinds of work for them on a freelance basis, including publications, exhibits, slide shows, and audio-visual productions. To be considered for work with GSA, an artist needs to contact GSA and set up an appointment to have his or her portfolio reviewed. Once reviewed, artists are classified according to their strengths and the type of publications that are appropriate for their type of work. The artists are then ranked according to the quality and style of their work. When a job needs to be contracted, GSA will contact three or four artists from their lists and ask them to submit bids. Bids are chosen based on both quality and price. Contact the department to set up a portfolio review.
Art-in-Architecture Program (PGA)
General Services Administration, 18th and F Sts., NW, Washington, DC 20405, 202-501-4228
By law, the Federal government must spend 0.5% of the cost of constructing or purchasing new buildings or completing major repairs and alterations of existing buildings on artwork. Artwork can include sculptures, murals, photographs, paintings, ceramic tile displays. Artwork can range from a couple of thousand dollars in cost to $100,000 or more, depending on the size of the project. To have your work considered for upcoming projects, you'll need to receive a program application from this office, then submit it along with 35mm slides of your work created within the last three years. You'll also need to include a current resume. Working with national, state, and local art agencies, GSA then nominates and selects artists to work on these projects.
Immigration and Naturalization Service
Glenn Brown, Printing Officer, Immigration and Naturalization Service, 425 I St., NW, Room 2115, Washington, DC 20536, 202-514-3210
Each year, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) retains three graphic artists or companies on a bidders list who are contacted whenever a project comes up that the INS cannot do themselves. Each artist is asked to submit a price on the job and the lowest gets the project. Each August, Mr. Rutter reviews the portfolios of any new artists interested in being placed on the bidders list. The three artists chosen are the ones who can provide the necessary quality of work for the lowest amount of money. The kind of work that INS contracts out often includes one-, two-, and multi-color bar and pie charts for presentations, along with calligraphy for handlettered certificates. Contact the department in July or August to arrange for a portfolio review.
Internal Revenue Service
Buddy Kirk, Internal Revenue Service, 111 Constitution Ave., NW, Room 1137, PC:M:PS:G, Washington, DC 20224, 202-622-7330
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) hires freelance artists to do exhibits, posters, computer graphics, illustrations, charts, brochures, flip charts, flyers, and much more. To be put on the vendors list and qualify to submit bids on projects, you'll need to have your portfolio reviewed by the IRS design group. If they are interested in your work and feel that they can use your special skills, you'll be placed on the list of vendors and receive notice when any relevant projects arise. This IRS design group spends about $650,000 annually on contracts with various artists.
Labor Department
Lionel White, Division of Audio-Visual Communication, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., SW, Room 6311, Washington, DC 20210, 202-219-7820
The Labor Department hires outside art contractors to do all kinds of projects, including cover to cover publications, name cards, graphic panels for exhibits, newsletters, editorial illustrations, book cover designs, stationery, and much more. If you're interested in being considered for these design contracting opportunities, contact this office and request that your name be placed on the mailing list of contract proposals that are mailed out each spring. Upon receiving the proposals, fill it out and return it, being sure to include background on your expertise, examples of technical experience, and price scale. A panel of experts will review the submitted portfolios and price proposals and choose the top applicants to work under Blanket Purchase Orders valued up to $25,000 annually. The Labor Department spends between $350,000 to $500,000 each year on freelance graphic art.
National Archives
Serene Werblood, National Archives and Records Administration, NEPP, Washington, DC 20408, 202-501-6056
The graphics division of the publications office hires freelance graphics artists to work on such projects as lobby posters, books, marketing brochures, direct mail, and exhibit catalogs. Every year, this office keeps two or three freelance designers under contract with Blanket Purchasing Agreements. For larger jobs, they send out requests for bids to artists on their vendor list. To be considered for contracting work with the publication division of the Archives, you'll need to contact this office and arrange to have your portfolio reviewed. If they like your work and think they can use you, you'll be put on their list of bidders. New contracts begin in October, so they like to have their prospective freelancers chosen by July/August.
National Institutes of Health
Ron Winterowd, National Institutes of Health, Medical Arts and Photography Branch, 900 Rockville Pike, Mail Stop 1016, Bldg. 10, Room B-2L316, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-2868
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) contracts out about 50-70% of their art and photographic work, which includes publication design, illustration, exhibit fabrication, photography, video production, charts/graphs, poster sessions, composites, and much more. To be considered for this contract work you'll need to contact this office and arrange for an interview and portfolio review. If they want to try you out, they use Open Market Requisition contracts. If they'd like to keep you on for a longer time, they may decide to sign you to a Blanket Purchase Agreement where you'll receive contract work valued up to a certain dollar amount over the course of a year.
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Bill Welsh, Repro-Graphics, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-0001, 301-975-2631
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) graphics department does some work with freelance artists. If you're interested in finding out more, you'll need to contact this office and have your portfolio reviewed by the department. If they're interested in using you, they will use the standard contracting procedures: a bidders list, blanket purchasing agreements, and so on.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Diane Boxley, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Room 725, (083312), 6010 Executive Blvd., Rockville, MD 20852, 301-413-0907
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hires freelance artists to do work on exhibits, publications, silk screening, wall plaques, photography, and much more. To be considered for the work, you'll need to arrange to have your portfolio reviewed. If they are interested in using your talents, they may decide to sign you to a Blanket Purchase Agreement, where they'll provide you with ongoing contract work up to a certain dollar value. Or they may simply contact you with a project in mind, ask for a price, and if they like it, you get the job. For more information on the portfolio review process, contact the office above.
National Park Service
Harper's Ferry Center, Contracting Branch, Administrative Annex, Taylor St., P.O. Box 50, Harper's Ferry, WV 25425, 304-535-6236
The National Park Service contracts the services of all kinds of artists, illustrators, and photographers. To qualify for these contracting opportunities, you'll need to have your portfolio reviewed by the NPS. The review can be arranged through this office - either in person or by sending copies of your work by mail. Once your portfolio is approved, you'll be placed on the bidders list and receive notification of projects in your area of specialty.
National Science Foundation
Division of Grants and Agreements, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230, 703-306-1210
Graphic artists and illustrators interested in doing contract work with the National Science Foundation (NSF) should send samples of their work along with a statement summarizing their capabilities and areas of specialty. Upon receiving this information, the Division of Grants and Contracts will circulate your resume and samples among the different NSF program offices, which in turn will decide if they are interested in using your services. This is the procedure used on contracts that are less than $20,000 in value. Over that amount, NSF places a notice in the Commerce Business Daily for open bidding.
U.S. Postal Service
Terry McCaffery, Stamp Marketing Division, Office of Philatelic and Retail Services, U.S. Postal Service, 475 L'Enfant Plaza, Room 4461-E, Washington, DC 20260, 202-268-6576
This office oversees both the production and promotion of U.S. postal stamps, and they hire freelance artists to help support many of their projects, including posters, brochures, and stamps. If you're interested in doing this kind of work, you'll need to contact this office and arrange to have your portfolio reviewed, either in person, or by submitting tear sheets of your work. For graphic art on their promotional materials, they work three different ways. For projects under $2,000, they will simply contact the artist on file they think is best for the job or who can do it the fastest. For projects up to $5,000, they will normally use a Basic Pricing Agreement that is in place with the artist for an entire year. For projects over $5,000, they will often ask for competitive bids from their list of vendors. Most of the stamps are done by freelance illustrators, 300 of whom they keep on file. Contracts usually are for $3,000 per stamp or $10,000 for a block of four. In 1992, they contracted with 26 artists to do 126 stamp designs. If you're interested in being considered for stamp illustration, you'll need to contact the above office and arrange to have your work reviewed. Depending on the project, contracts are awarded in a similar fashion to those for the Postal Services promotional materials described above.
Thad Dilley
Communications Department, Room 2P530, U.S. Postal Service, 475 L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC 20260, 202-268-2194
This department of the U.S. Postal Services contracts the services of graphic designers, illustrators, calligraphers, and photographers to work on their publication materials. To be put on their bidders list, you first need to send them a description of your graphics capabilities and specialties, and then make an appointment to go in for a portfolio review. If after reviewing your work, they are interested in using your talents, you'll be put on a bidders list and notified when projects arise that you are qualified to complete.
Public Health Service
Paris Pacchione, Room 36-36, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, 301-443-1090
This technical services branch of the Public Health Service (PHS) works to meet the art requirements for the Indian Health Service, the Office of the Surgeon General, the Assistant Secretary of Health, and the Agency for Health Care Policy Review, among others. To keep up with their heavy work load, they contract out a large amount of art projects, including silk screen posters, banners, brochures, plaques, exhibit designs, 3-D displays, and much more. If you're interested in doing work for them on a freelance basis, contact Harris Pacchione to arrange for a portfolio review. If they like your work and want to use your talents, you'll be put on a bidders list and perhaps offered a Blanket Purchasing Agreement and asked to bid on jobs as they come up during the year. Currently PHS maintains about 30 BPAs with freelance artists. For major jobs, they'll send out proposal requests to three vendors on their list and ask for proposals.
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration
Gene Souder; Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration; Graphics Branch, Room 789; 5600 Fishers Lane; Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4183
The Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) hires freelance artists and design firms to work on such projects as view graphs, exhibits, publications, logos, and much more. On June 1st of each year they award the new graphic design contracts for the new fiscal year, so if you're interested in being considered for this work, you'll need to contact this office and arrange for a portfolio review. Each year, approximately 15 firms and individuals are awarded Blanket Purchase Agreements where they are given up to a certain dollar amount of work throughout the year. Work is also contracted by: Health Resources and Services Administration, Ray Targrowski, 301-443-1014
U.S. Geological Survey
Joy Durant, National Mapping Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr., MS-508 National Center, Reston, VA 22092, 703-648-6880
The National Mapping Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracts the work of freelance graphic designers to create pamphlets and educational pieces dealing with the earth sciences. Companies and individuals interested in being considered for contracting work should submit background information on their capabilities, along with samples of their work. If the USGS is interested in using your services, you'll be placed on a bidders list and notified when an appropriate contracting opportunity arises. For contracts valued under $2,500 the USGS will simply contact the artist they think is best suited for the job and able to do it in the needed time. The USGS awards about $100,000 in contracts annually for graphic art.
Small Business Administration
Publications and Graphic Design Services, Office of Public Communications, Small Business Administration, 409 Third St., SW, Washington, DC 20416, 202-205-6740
The Small Business Administration (SBA) contracts out about 70% of the graphics and art design work that they produce. These projects include publication design, banners, name tags, oversized presentation boards, pamphlets and brochures, and more. If you're interested in being considered for contract work with SBA, contact the office and arrange for a portfolio review. If they'd like to use your services, they'll have your name put on a bidders list in SBA's Office of Procurement and Grants Management. When a project arises, Procurement will notify at least three artists on the bidders list and ask them to submit bids on the project.
Smithsonian Institute
Ann Garvey, Smithsonian Institute Press, 470 L'Enfant Plaza, Suite 7100, Washington, DC 20560, 202-287-3738, ext. 352
This office provides the graphic art and design support for much of the Smithsonian Institute, including all of the publications produced by the Smithsonian Institute Press (this does not include the Smithsonian Magazine, which is an entirely separate entity). Although much of the work is done internally, they do occasionally hire the services of freelancers to work on projects that they don't have the time or expertise to complete themselves. This work may involve graphic design, mechanicals, and every so often, illustration work. To be considered for this work, you'll need to contact the department to arrange for a portfolio review. If they are interested in your work, you'll be contacted to submit bids on projects as they come up, with the lowest bid winning the job.
State Department
Rose Grover, Graphics Division, U.S. Department of State, 21st and C Sts., SW, Room 1655, Washington, DC 20520, 202-647-1082
When the different bureaus within the State Department need outside graphics support, they contact artists on a vendors list that they maintain. The kind of projects that get farmed out to freelancers are usually last minute projects that the Graphics Division doesn't have the time or capability to do, such as charts for congressional briefings. To be put on the vendors listing, an artist first needs to be cleared by Rose Grover, the head of the Graphics Division. This process may include a portfolio review. Once on the bidders list, artists can receive direct calls from the individual bureaus for bids on projects.
Treasury Department
Stu Gates, Printing and Graphics, U.S. Department of the Treasury, 1500 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Annex, Room B-39, Washington, DC 20220, 202-622-2160
To handle some of their large and mid-level graphic design work, the Treasury contracts the services of outside design vendors. This work is awarded on a competitive basis through Blanket Purchase Agreements where the graphics/design firm or individual is given contract work up to a certain pre-determined dollar value throughout the year on an as-needed basis. Contact this division for more information on getting your portfolio reviewed and being considered for the bidders list.
U.S. Information Agency
Howard Cincotta, Visual Services, U.S. Information Agency, 301 4th St., SW, Washington, DC, 20547, 202-619-4269
The U.S. Information Agency's (USIA) Visual Services does some work with freelance artists. If you're interested in finding out more, you'll need to contact this office and have your portfolio reviewed by the department.



 








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